Tuesday, 15 March 2016

Connected Councils: A digital vision of local government in 2025

This report examines how digital technologies could help councils save money, foster local economic growth and deliver better outcomes for local residents and communities.

It sets out a vision of where councils might be in 2025 to better understand what opportunities they face now.

Key Findings

Local government has made huge progress in enabling residents to carry out basic transactions online. But most councils have a long way to go to deliver smooth, frictionless services and fully digitise their back offices. Digitisation isn’t just about developing digital services; depending on the level of ambition, digital tools can help:

Save money and deliver better outcomes by intervening earlier and helping people manage their own conditions.
Transform the way that councils work internally, commission services and partners, diagnose and solve problems, use public space, and attract talent.
Make services smoother and easier to access, more personalised and user-responsive.
Put residents at the heart of local problem-solving and decision-making and create an environment which supports businesses to startup and scale.

The 2025 vision

Like the best tech companies, future councils will be lean, agile and data-driven. Siloed services will be replaced with multi-agency teams that form around specific local challenges. A truly mobile workforce has freed up public space. Almost all transactions take place online. Instead of two-dimensional council websites, interactive platforms connect users with third-party apps and services, and stream personalised content on local democracy, jobs and services.

Relational services (such as social care) still rely heavily on face-to-face contact. But digital tools help people to manage their own long-term conditions and connect to a broader network of support, such as peer mentors, health coaches, friends and family, volunteers and group-based activities. Digital technologies have helped councils take a more ambitious approach to place-shaping. A larger share of public contracts go to high-growth SMEs. Councils systematically engage residents in decisions about how services are commissioned, delivered and evaluated.

Policy Recommendations

The report recommends:

Councils become digital by default, moving all transactional services online and fully digitising their back offices by 2020.

The Cabinet Office should bring together key local government actors to define - and continuously update - open standards for data for the whole public sector.
Leading councils should come together to create a market for new digital products in cases where local authority needs are not currently being met by off-the-peg solutions.

City regions should be required to establish an Office of Data Analytics (ODA) as part of devolution settlements. The ODA – modelled on the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics pioneered in New York City – should be tasked with helping city leaders and public bodies bring together and analyse data to support regional economic growth and local public sector reform.

Councils should invest in accessibility, by providing online and human navigation support to help people use digital services in public spaces, such as libraries and jobcentres. They should also ensure that pathways between different services are seamless, jargon free, and that people with different digital needs are appropriately ‘triaged’.

The Cabinet Office should review and publish detailed guidance on the ethical dimensions of data-sharing and algorithm-supported decision-making.

This report examines how digital technologies could help councils save money, foster local economic growth and deliver better outcomes for local residents and communities.
It sets out a vision of where councils might be in 2025 to better understand what opportunities they face now.

Key Findings

Local government has made huge progress in enabling residents to carry out basic transactions online. But most councils have a long way to go to deliver smooth, frictionless services and fully digitise their back offices. Digitisation isn’t just about developing digital services; depending on the level of ambition, digital tools can help:
  • Save money and deliver better outcomes by intervening earlier and helping people manage their own conditions.
  • Transform the way that councils work internally, commission services and partners, diagnose and solve problems, use public space, and attract talent.
  • Make services smoother and easier to access, more personalised and user-responsive.
  • Put residents at the heart of local problem-solving and decision-making and create an environment which supports businesses to startup and scale.

The 2025 vision

Like the best tech companies, future councils will be lean, agile and data-driven. Siloed services will be replaced with multi-agency teams that form around specific local challenges. A truly mobile workforce has freed up public space. Almost all transactions take place online. Instead of two-dimensional council websites, interactive platforms connect users with third-party apps and services, and stream personalised content on local democracy, jobs and services.
Relational services (such as social care) still rely heavily on face-to-face contact. But digital tools help people to manage their own long-term conditions and connect to a broader network of support, such as peer mentors, health coaches, friends and family, volunteers and group-based activities. Digital technologies have helped councils take a more ambitious approach to place-shaping. A larger share of public contracts go to high-growth SMEs. Councils systematically engage residents in decisions about how services are commissioned, delivered and evaluated.

Policy Recommendations

The report recommends:
  • Councils become digital by default, moving all transactional services online and fully digitising their back offices by 2020. 
  • The Cabinet Office should bring together key local government actors to define - and continuously update - open standards for data for the whole public sector. 
  • Leading councils should come together to create a market for new digital products in cases where local authority needs are not currently being met by off-the-peg solutions. 
  • City regions should be required to establish an Office of Data Analytics (ODA) as part of devolution settlements. The ODA – modelled on the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics pioneered in New York City – should be tasked with helping city leaders and public bodies bring together and analyse data to support regional economic growth and local public sector reform.
  • Councils should invest in accessibility, by providing online and human navigation support to help people use digital services in public spaces, such as libraries and jobcentres. They should also ensure that pathways between different services are seamless, jargon free, and that people with different digital needs are appropriately ‘triaged’. 
  • The Cabinet Office should review and publish detailed guidance on the ethical dimensions of data-sharing and algorithm-supported decision-making.
- See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/connected-councils-digital-vision-local-government-2025#sthash.VIN7bLvi.dpuf
This report examines how digital technologies could help councils save money, foster local economic growth and deliver better outcomes for local residents and communities.
It sets out a vision of where councils might be in 2025 to better understand what opportunities they face now.

Key Findings

Local government has made huge progress in enabling residents to carry out basic transactions online. But most councils have a long way to go to deliver smooth, frictionless services and fully digitise their back offices. Digitisation isn’t just about developing digital services; depending on the level of ambition, digital tools can help:
  • Save money and deliver better outcomes by intervening earlier and helping people manage their own conditions.
  • Transform the way that councils work internally, commission services and partners, diagnose and solve problems, use public space, and attract talent.
  • Make services smoother and easier to access, more personalised and user-responsive.
  • Put residents at the heart of local problem-solving and decision-making and create an environment which supports businesses to startup and scale.

The 2025 vision

Like the best tech companies, future councils will be lean, agile and data-driven. Siloed services will be replaced with multi-agency teams that form around specific local challenges. A truly mobile workforce has freed up public space. Almost all transactions take place online. Instead of two-dimensional council websites, interactive platforms connect users with third-party apps and services, and stream personalised content on local democracy, jobs and services.
Relational services (such as social care) still rely heavily on face-to-face contact. But digital tools help people to manage their own long-term conditions and connect to a broader network of support, such as peer mentors, health coaches, friends and family, volunteers and group-based activities. Digital technologies have helped councils take a more ambitious approach to place-shaping. A larger share of public contracts go to high-growth SMEs. Councils systematically engage residents in decisions about how services are commissioned, delivered and evaluated.

Policy Recommendations

The report recommends:
  • Councils become digital by default, moving all transactional services online and fully digitising their back offices by 2020. 
  • The Cabinet Office should bring together key local government actors to define - and continuously update - open standards for data for the whole public sector. 
  • Leading councils should come together to create a market for new digital products in cases where local authority needs are not currently being met by off-the-peg solutions. 
  • City regions should be required to establish an Office of Data Analytics (ODA) as part of devolution settlements. The ODA – modelled on the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics pioneered in New York City – should be tasked with helping city leaders and public bodies bring together and analyse data to support regional economic growth and local public sector reform.
  • Councils should invest in accessibility, by providing online and human navigation support to help people use digital services in public spaces, such as libraries and jobcentres. They should also ensure that pathways between different services are seamless, jargon free, and that people with different digital needs are appropriately ‘triaged’. 
  • The Cabinet Office should review and publish detailed guidance on the ethical dimensions of data-sharing and algorithm-supported decision-making.
- See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/connected-councils-digital-vision-local-government-2025#sthash.VIN7bLvi.dpuf
This report examines how digital technologies could help councils save money, foster local economic growth and deliver better outcomes for local residents and communities.
It sets out a vision of where councils might be in 2025 to better understand what opportunities they face now.

Key Findings

Local government has made huge progress in enabling residents to carry out basic transactions online. But most councils have a long way to go to deliver smooth, frictionless services and fully digitise their back offices. Digitisation isn’t just about developing digital services; depending on the level of ambition, digital tools can help:
  • Save money and deliver better outcomes by intervening earlier and helping people manage their own conditions.
  • Transform the way that councils work internally, commission services and partners, diagnose and solve problems, use public space, and attract talent.
  • Make services smoother and easier to access, more personalised and user-responsive.
  • Put residents at the heart of local problem-solving and decision-making and create an environment which supports businesses to startup and scale.

The 2025 vision

Like the best tech companies, future councils will be lean, agile and data-driven. Siloed services will be replaced with multi-agency teams that form around specific local challenges. A truly mobile workforce has freed up public space. Almost all transactions take place online. Instead of two-dimensional council websites, interactive platforms connect users with third-party apps and services, and stream personalised content on local democracy, jobs and services.
Relational services (such as social care) still rely heavily on face-to-face contact. But digital tools help people to manage their own long-term conditions and connect to a broader network of support, such as peer mentors, health coaches, friends and family, volunteers and group-based activities. Digital technologies have helped councils take a more ambitious approach to place-shaping. A larger share of public contracts go to high-growth SMEs. Councils systematically engage residents in decisions about how services are commissioned, delivered and evaluated.

Policy Recommendations

The report recommends:
  • Councils become digital by default, moving all transactional services online and fully digitising their back offices by 2020. 
  • The Cabinet Office should bring together key local government actors to define - and continuously update - open standards for data for the whole public sector. 
  • Leading councils should come together to create a market for new digital products in cases where local authority needs are not currently being met by off-the-peg solutions. 
  • City regions should be required to establish an Office of Data Analytics (ODA) as part of devolution settlements. The ODA – modelled on the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics pioneered in New York City – should be tasked with helping city leaders and public bodies bring together and analyse data to support regional economic growth and local public sector reform.
  • Councils should invest in accessibility, by providing online and human navigation support to help people use digital services in public spaces, such as libraries and jobcentres. They should also ensure that pathways between different services are seamless, jargon free, and that people with different digital needs are appropriately ‘triaged’. 
  • The Cabinet Office should review and publish detailed guidance on the ethical dimensions of data-sharing and algorithm-supported decision-making.
- See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/connected-councils-digital-vision-local-government-2025#sthash.VIN7bLvi.dpuf
Connected Councils: A digital vision of local government in 2025 - See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/connected-councils-digital-vision-local-government-2025#sthash.VIN7bLvi.dpuf

Friday, 11 March 2016

Why common data standards are so important for local services: Introductory video

Video

This video explains what our local waste service standards is about and why it needs to be done. It explains what a data standard is and how standards and APIs could help local services and digital systems to run more smoothly, and save a lot of money.
You can find the evidence that we refer to in the video in this business case. It suggests that local authorities could make significant savings and improve their services if data standards and APIs become a part of all sorts of other local public services.

1. Executive summary

  • Use of a waste data standard could drive a total of £505 million in savings for English local authorities over a 14 year period
  • £120 million of these savings could be realised in the first 7 years
  • £362.8 million of the 14 year savings are directly associated with waste data standards, with an additional £142 million coming from associated channel shift savings
  • We estimate that individual councils could save between £117,900 and £219,255 annually by implementing data standards (including resulting channel shift savings)[4]
  • We make the case that data standards are essential for enabling better systems integration, which in turn leads to more successful and sustainable channel shift
  • Standards can also enable new partnerships and business models as well as stimulating innovation
  • While we make the case that councils and suppliers should invest in adopting common standards, we acknowledge that the benefits of adoption are only guaranteed when a critical mass of councils and their suppliers have implemented the standard, and that there are some barriers to achieving this
  • Based on the experience of this pilot project, we also make the case for local data standards to be developed in an agile, iterative, integration-driven way, both to sustain the momentum this project has created, and as a means of tackling other local service transformation challenges



Friday, 4 March 2016

Video by ex GDS deputy director, Tom Loosemore

Original Article

"What we need is a critical mass of revolutionaries across local government that are willing to work together, are willing to collaborate, are willing to give up their old ways of thinking, give up their old ways of doing things and completely redesign (local) public services from top to bottom.

Ex-Deputy Director for the Government Digital Service, Tom Loosemore, describes it far better than I will be able to here in a talk given to attendees at the Code for America Summit. If you’ve got a spare 50 minutes, I HIGHLY recommend you watch this video":


Notes from the video:

We need to create new public institutions that are aligned to the digital age.

"Enough of this internet jibber jabber" said the senior civil servant.  There in lies the problem.

We need to bring government into the 21st century, we need new government institutions.

There have been changes in our government structure but we were not nearly bold enough. We have had a paper based government since 1200 in the UK.  The institutions live in total silos from one  another.  Currently we  are making existing processes, digital.

We need to reshape our government infrastructure from scratch.
Create a small team.
Hide them away.

We need:
Services so good they were previously unimaginable.
Services that work first time in real time.
New services set up in a matter of weeks.
Those in the front line helping the people that need it most.
Fraud to be designed out.
Minimum viable personal data.
Responsive services.

Policies and rules that are visible as code.....
Open source software that is transparent.
Everything should be open to be used by the wider community.

Data is the foundation of the digital nation.